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Love of the Telling

Commonplaces

God never withholds from His child that which His love and wisdom call good. God’s refusals are always merciful — “severe mercies” at times but mercies all the same. God never denies us our heart’s desire except to give us something better. — Elisabeth Elliot

Music Playlist

My Podcast Subscriptions

Rev. Robert McCurley - SermonAudio / videos
Rev. David Silversides - SermonAudio / iTunes
Dr. Joel Beeke -
SermonAudio / iTunes
Rev. Ryan McGraw - SermonAudio
Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary Podcast - Confessing Our Hope (iTunes) / web
Reformed Theological Seminary on iTunes U - Free RTS virtual courses
Westminster Theological Seminary on iTunes U - Free course lectures

In the words of C.S. Lewis in The Great Divorce, my prayer is that God by His grace would keep me from this:

Every poet and musician and artist, but for Grace, is drawn away from love of the thing he tells, to love of the telling till, down in Deep Hell, they cannot be interested in God at all but only in what they say about Him.  For it doesn’t stop at being interested in paint, you know.  They sink lowerbecome interested in their own personalities and then in nothing but their own reputations.

Though I disagree with many of Lewis’ theological beliefs (and would not recommend his writings to new believers due to some serious errors), I think he is a literary genius with some insight of how people think.  The setting of the above excerpt is Lewis telling a story about a conversation between an angel and a famous artist who has just died.  The angel tells this artist of the stunning beauty of heaven, to convince him to enter in.  The artist grew excited, imagining the beautiful paintings that he will make of what is in heaven.  However, he became angry upon learning that, once he enters heaven, there is no more need for him to paint; in heaven, he gets to simply enjoy the real thing.  He protested that, as a painter, art itself is an end.  The angel replies, “Ink and catgut and paint were necessary down there [during your earthly life], but they are also dangerous stimulants.”

Each good thing in this world points us to, and tells us of, its Maker.  Painting of a beautiful scenery tells us of the creative handiwork of its Creator in real life to His glory.  Rather than using art as a means to remind us of the Master Artist, the artist in the story elevates art (and perhaps his artistic abilities and reputation) as an end.  The story reminds me that this danger of idolatry applies not only to poetry and music and art, but also to religious activities and theological conversations.

May the object of my affection lie not in the telling about my Savior, but in my Savior Himself Who is altogether lovely.  May my writing of Him not be an end in itself, but (by His grace) a reflection of love for Him.


4 Comments

  1. David Tran says:

    I actually have that book somewhere… just never got to reading it. Hope you can make it out to another event at our church!

    By the way, after playing the music, when trying to type up any comment, it intercepts the spacebar and arrow keystrokes to control it.

    • Jessica says:

      Hi David, thanks for the kind invite about another event. I had fun and good fellowship with the group last time. And thanks so much for letting me know about the problem with the keystrokes and audio player. I had no idea until you mentioned it, so I am glad you wrote to let me know. I decided to forgo that audio player and change it with a new one. :-) Thanks again!

  2. Lindsay says:

    Jess,

    It’s good to see this place back up and running. Though I come for the writing, and because you’re my friend, the music and slideshow make it all the more inviting.

    This is where we first met, no?

    Love in Christ,
    Lindsay

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Greetings

Hi, my name is Jessica. Welcome to my blog! I'm a Reformed Presbyterian who enjoys reading, learning more of God, playing piano, the 16th-17th century Puritans, apologetics, old-fashioned things, and exchanging thoughts with others. This is a place where I write some thoughts or things I'd like to learn.

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