Out of the Tiger’s Mouth

Posted on Posted in Book Reviews

out of the tiger's mouthI read Out of the Tiger’s Mouth, a biography of the late Reformed theologian Dr. Charles H. Chao, several years ago and came across something I wrote of it again just this week.  Being of Chinese ethnicity, I was so intrigued to learn more about his life, as he was among the first to ever translate and publish Reformed and Puritan literature into the Chinese language.  Having Chinese-speaking family members, I was very excited that such works are made accessible.

This book shares the story of Dr. Chao’s geographical journey from the East to the West, as well as his spiritual pilgrimage from his Christian conversion in China to his ordination as a minister in the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America (RPCNA).

Despite persecution from Chinese Communists, Dr. Chao narrowly escaped from prison and death.  On one occasion, he (along with other unarmed men) was rounded up by Chinese Communists, to march as a living shield in front of Communist soldiers while they attack the Nationalist soldiers.  In His providence, the Lord provided a way for him to hide and flee for his life.

I also learn of the Lord’s providence in crossing Dr. Chao’s path with that of other theologians who were influential in shaping his theological persuasions, such as Dr. Loraine Boettner and the Rev. J. G. Vos.  He was profoundly influenced by the teaching of Dr. Vos, when Dr. Vos and family went to China as missionaries.  In the words of Dr. Boettner, Dr. Chao was “a man of God—with untiring devotion.”

Another interesting part was how he and Dr. Samuel Boyle co-founded the Reformation Translation Fellowship, which translates and distributes literature consistent with Reformed theological perspective into Chinese, in Mainland China.  (Some of the works are available via CrtsBooks.net).

The Lord called Dr. Chao home in 2010 at the age of 94.  In reading his life story, I’m reminded and encouraged by God’s faithfulness and sovereignty in using Dr. Chao as a vessel to proclaim the good news of His sovereign grace in the midst of life-threatening events, trials, and persecution of communist China; and in how He used him to minister to Chinese-speaking people through sound literature.

 

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